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Dash off a Fiver to the ACLU

What can you do to save the world with an Amazon Dash Button?

Has a new era of enablement reached the hockey stick curve of exponential growth?  I think it has.  I've been picking up this vibe, and I may not be the first to sense things around me.  I've got some feedback that I very poor at it in the personal sphere.  However, on a larger scale, on an abstract level, in the field of tech phenomena I've got a bit of a streak going.  Mind you I'm not rich on a Zuckerberg level... and my general problem is actualizing the idea as apposed to just having the brilliant idea - or recognizing the opportunity.

A colleague told me I would like this tinker's Dash Button hack.  It uses the little hardware IoT button Amazon built to sell more laundry soap - a bit of imaginative thinking outside of the supply chain problem domain and a few hours of coding.  Repurposing the giant AWS Cloud Mainframe, that the Matrix Architect has designed to enslave you, to give the ACLU a Fiver ($5) every time you feel like one of the talking heads (#45) in Washington DC has infringed upon one of you civil liberties.


Now I think this is the power of a true IoT the fact that an enabling technology could allow the emergent property that was not conceived of in it's design.  No one has really tried to solve the problem of the democrat voice of the people.  We use the power of currency to proxy for so many concepts in our society, and it appears that the SCOTUS has accepted that currency and it's usage is a from of speech (although not free - do you see what I did there?).  What would the Architect of our Matrix learn if he/she/it could collect all the thoughts of people when they had a visceral reaction to an event correlate that reaction to the event, measure the power of the reaction over a vast sample of the population and feed that reaction into the decision making process via a stream of funding for or against a proposed policy.  Now real power of this feedback system will occur when the feedback message may mutate the proposal (the power of Yes/AND).

I can see this as enabling real trend toward democracy - and of course this disrupts the incumbent power structure of the representative government (federal republic).  Imagine a hack-a-thon where all the political organizations and the charities and the religions came together in a convention center.  There are tables and spaces and boxes upon boxes of Amazon Dashes Buttons.  We ask the organizations what they like about getting a Fiver every time the talking head mouths off, and what data they may also need to capture to make the value stream most effective in their unique organization.  And we build and test this into a eco-system on top of the AWS Cloud.
"You know, if one person, just one person does it they may think he's really sick and they won't take him."
What would it take to set this up one weekend...  I've found that I'm not a leader.  I don't get a lot of followers when I have an idea... but I have found that I can make one heck of a good first-follower!

"And three people do it, three, can you imagine, three people walking in singin a bar of Alice's Restaurant and walking out. They may think it's an organization. And can you, can you imagine fifty people a day, I said fifty people a day walking in singin a bar of Alice's Restaurant and walking out. And friends they may thinks it's a movement."
I will just through this out here and allow the reader to link up the possibilities.


Elmo From ‘Sesame Street’ Learns He's Fired Because Of Donald Trump’s Budget Cuts.  Would this be a good test case for a Dash Button mash up to donate to Sesame Workshop.


See Also:

GitHub Repo Donation Button by Nathan Pryor
Instructables Dash Button projects
Coder Turns Amazon Dash Button Into ACLU Donation Tool by Mary Emily O'Hara
How to start a movement - Derek Sivers TED Talk
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